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Developed in partnership with

October 19, 2019—March 22, 2020

Journey to South Africa to explore what National Geographic described as “one of the greatest fossil discoveries of the past half century.” Come get face-to-face with our ancient ancestors and uncover traits we share and those that make us different. Along the way, you’ll uncover the remarkable tales of the dedicated scientists making these groundbreaking discoveries and the questions that continue to inspire them. Their stories – and those of these ancient fossils – will inspire your inner explorer to dig deep into our common past and reflect on what it means to be human.

Don’t miss this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to
discover our shared human history.

Meet our Ancestors

Karabo


Age: 1.97 million years old
Genus/Species: Australopithecus sediba
Hometown: ~30 miles northwest of Joburg
Lifestyle: walking upright, climbing trees, and hanging and swinging from branches
Diet: softer foods like grasses, gritty tree bark, and fruit

Neo


Age: 335,000-236,000 years old
Genus/Species: Homo naledi
Hometown: ~35 miles northwest of Joburg
Lifestyle: walking upright, climbing trees, possibly working with or creating hand tools, and long walks
Diet: large amounts of small, hard objects, and possibly raw tubers (potatoes)

Making Headlines

The Perot Museum is proud to host the exclusive world premiere of Origins: Fossils from the Cradle of Humankind. With this being the first – and likely only – time these two specimens will ever leave South Africa, the exhibition is making worldwide headlines.

Perot Museum of Nature and Science to debut Origins: Fossils from the Cradle of Humankind

KERA

Perot Museum of Nature and Science to debut Origins: Fossils from the Cradle of Humankind

Eurekalert!

Perot Museum announces it will exhibit two rare fossils from South Africa

Dallas News

Homo Naledi And Australopithecus Sediba To Be Exhibited In Perot Museum

Science magazine
...

Perot Museum To Host Rare Fossils From South Africa's 'Cradle of Humankind'

KERA
...

Perot Museum of Nature and Science to debut Origins: Fossils from the Cradle of Humankind

Eurekalert!
...

Perot Museum announces it will exhibit two rare fossils from South Africa

Dallas News
...

Homo Naledi And Australopithecus Sediba To Be Exhibited In Perot Museum

Science magazine

Making Discoveries

Truly a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to explore our shared human history.
One venue. One time.

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98 Feet below the surface


The exhibition also will showcase the collaboration and dedication demonstrated by a diverse, multinational scientific team of women and men, led by Professor Lee Berger of the University of the Witwatersrand. The team’s historic breakthroughs depict an inspiring tale of innovation, courage, and collaboration in the search for a deeper understanding of humankind’s shared ancestry. Their experiences also serve as an opportunity to encourage a spirit of curiosity and exploration to spark career inspiration in the next generation.

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Tools of the Trade


Tools of the trade have come a long way. While brushes, trowels, and chisels will always be part of their toolkit, archaeologists today have access to emerging technologies that have proven to be gamechangers in the realm of studying our ancient past.

Google Maps - Satellite view has made scouring a landscape for potential excavation sites something scientists can do from a computer.
LIDAR - Scientists can virtually capture extremely accurate and high resolution data of a landscape without ever having set foot on it.
High-resolution 3D scanning is used to catpure a detailed 3D image of a specimen so it can be studied without risk of damage.

What are they looking for?


There’s no bone too small to make a big impact. Scientists study different parts of ancient remains to help tell the different stories of our evolutionary journey.

Hand fossils help scientists understand if a specimen swung from tree branches or if they could use hand-held tools.
These remains help us understand brain capacity as well as what species a specimen belongs to.
Feet can inform whether a specimen walked upright on its two rear limbs or had the ability to walk long distances.

Plan Your Visit

Don’t miss this once-in-a-lifetime
opportunity - reserve your tickets today!